How Does Fluoride Help Our Teeth?

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Fluoride is a natural element that is found in water, air, and the earth’s crust. It is regarded as one of the most common 20 elements in the earth’s crust and is a chemical ion of fluorine. Scientists explored the benefits of fluoride many decades ago, and they found that more fluoride in the drinking water leads to fewer tooth cavities. By the mid-1940s, communities began to put more fluoride in their water supplies to protect kids and adults from tooth decay and other oral health problems. As a result, they gave way to building healthier and stronger communities.

Fluoride is beneficial for teeth and overall oral health. It rebuilds weakened tooth enamel which gets damaged when acids wear away it. The mineral content in fluoride helps restore the tooth enamel, which is essential for protecting our teeth. When we get a sufficient amount of fluoride content, it helps to reverse the early signs of tooth decay. It makes the tooth enamel more resistant to the acids that can otherwise disrupt our teeth. Moreover, fluoride helps fight harmful oral bacteria and slows down the loss of minerals from tooth enamel. It remineralizes the tooth enamel and protects against tooth cavities.

Fluoride: A Superhero and a Rescuer:

There is no doubt that fluoride is a superhero that lives inside our mouth to protect our teeth. When we eat chocolates, candies, noodles, or crackers; the cavity-causing bacteria start to emerge. As a result, it produces acids that directly attack our tooth enamel. Tooth enamel is the outer covering of our teeth that is stronger than bones and is composed of calcium and phosphate content.

When this tooth enamel gets damaged, the calcium and phosphate begin to strip away from it, and we become more prone to cavities and tooth decay. However, our saliva then plays its role. It fights the acid attack by restoring the calcium and phosphate content to protect our teeth.

When saliva has fluoride content, it becomes a superhero and teams up with phosphate and calcium to form a powerful defense mechanism against cavities. As a result, our teeth become more resistant to tooth decay, and fluoride helps to strengthen them.

According to the American Dental Association, fluoride is a “nature’s cavity fighter” when consumed in prescribed amounts. Too much of it can cause tooth discoloration, neurological problems, skeletal weakness, acne, high blood pressure, and intellectual deficiencies. The recommended dose of fluoride for adults is 2.9mg, whereas it is 2.0-2.2 for kids, respectively.

Conclusion

There are many sources of fluoride, for instance, groundwater, drinking water in fluoridated communities, dietary supplements, certain foods (like spinach, grapes, shrimps, etc.), toothpaste, and professional dental products. However, it is recommended to visit your nearest dentist for expert advice so that you can stick to the prescribed amount of fluoride to protect your teeth.

Contact your dentist in Walnut Creek, Dr. Darvishzadeh at Walnut Creek Dental to learn more.

Resources:

Fluoride And Its Benefits For Our Teeth

*Neither this nor any other content in this media is meant to prescribe, recommend, or prevent any treatment or procedure. We highly recommend that you get the advice of a qualified dentist or other medical practitioners regarding your specific dental condition. 

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